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Woody Guthrie's version used "Hey-hey," and Bob Dylan's version used "uh-huh" in the same way after several lines.

Other examples in film and TV include: The song has been recorded by Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and many others.

Uncle Rat's permission received, the two work out details of the wedding.

Some versions end with a cat, snake or other creature devouring the couple and wedding guests.

Usually, the final verse states that there's a piece of food on the shelf, and that if the listener wants to hear more verses, they have to sing it themselves. Spaeth has a note claiming that the original version of this was supposed to refer to François, Duke of Anjou's wooing of Elizabeth I of England, however, this was in 1579 and the original Scottish version was already published.

If the second known version (1611, in Melismata, also reprinted in Chappell) were the oldest, this might be possible — there are seeming political references to "Gib, our cat" and "Dick, our Drake." But the Wedderburn text, which at least anticipates the song, predates the reign of Queen Elizabeth by nine years, and Queen Mary by four.

If it refers to any queen at all, it would seemingly have to be Mary Stuart. Wells, however, in the liner notes to the LP Brave Boys; New England traditions in folk music (New World Records 239, 1977), suggests that the original may have been satirically altered in 1580 when it was recorded in the register of the London Company of Stationers, as this would have been at the height of the unpopular courtship.

He states that in 1547 the Scottish Queen Consort, Mary of Guise, under attack from Henry VIII, sought to marry her daughter Princess Mary (later Mary Queen of Scots), "Mrs."Frog Went A-Courtin'" (Roud 16, see alternative titles) is an English language folk song.Its first known appearance is in Wedderburn's Complaynt of Scotland (1548) under the name "The Frog cam to the Myl dur", though this is in Scots rather than English.There is a reference in the London Company of Stationers' Register of 1580 to "A Moste Strange Weddinge of the Frogge and the Mouse." There are many texts of the ballad; however the oldest known musical version is in Thomas Ravenscroft's Melismata in 1611. She is willing but must ask permission of Uncle Rat.In other versions such as "King Kong Kitchie Kitchie Ki-Me-O" by Chubby Parker, Frog fights and kills Miss Mouse's other suitors (an owl, bat and bumblebee) after they interrupt his proposal.

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