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To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses.Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments.Match Group, the largest company by market share in both Canada and the U.S., has been buying up smaller dating services for years."Clearly, part of this is an attempt on Facebook for public relations reasons to try to turn the page to have the media cover Facebook by looking at a different aspect of the company rather than talking about privacy concerns that users are having," he said."It's a very convenient coincidence, if it is purely a coincidence."Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg did acknowledge people may have privacy concerns as he announced the dating service at its conference for software developers in California on Tuesday.In 2011, Match Group acquired Ok Cupid, and in 2015, it bought the Vancouver-based dating site, Plenty of Fish, for 5 million US.

Companies have targeted niche communities and different religious, ethnic and age groups with apps such as Christian Mingle, JDate, Farmers Only, Grindr, and Silver Singles. S., revenue — while still expected to increase — is forecast to grow more slowly over the next five years. S., larger players are expected to continue acquiring smaller ones, potentially shrinking the number of companies, according to IBISWorld.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced his plans to introduce a dating feature during a speech at the company's annual F8 developers conference in San Jose, Calif., on Tuesday.

(Stephen Lam/Reuters)As Facebook continues to face questions about its ability to protect the privacy of users' data in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, some may wonder about the timing of its announcement that it will soon launch a dating service — which arguably would contain people's most personal information.

"[It's] an interesting move," said Fuyuki Kurasawa, an expert in social media and digital culture at York University in Toronto.

The timing may seem like "a very odd choice in terms of addressing issues of privacy," but Facebook's foray into the booming online dating industry actually makes sense from a "strategic and business perspective," he said.

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